Summer Village of Bondiss
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The Summer Village of Bondiss is a small municipality located approximately 170 KM northeast of Edmonton, Alberta on the South East shore of Skeleton Lake. Skeleton Lake is a medium-sized lake located within the County of Athabasca in central Alberta. The lake is 6.5 kilometres (4.0 mi) northeast of the town of Boyle, Alberta, along Highway 63. It is located in Athabasca County, 170 kilometres (110 mi) northeast of the City of Edmonton.


The lake's name is a translation of the Cree Cheply Sakhahigan which means "place of the skeletons." A Cree chief is buried along the eastern shore of the lake.


There are now approximately 890 cottage and trailer sites around Skeleton Lake. There are 11 subdivisions surrounding the lake which are part of the County of Athabasca containing approximately 300 lots. As well, the Summer Village of Mewatha Beach with approximately 220 properties, the Summer Village of Bondiss with approximately 200 lots and Shoreline Campground with approximately 170 sites are all located on the shores of Skeleton Lake. A public golf course is located in the Summer Village of Bondiss on the east side of the lake.


Skeleton Lake is a good setting for power boating, water skiing, swimming, fishing and canoeing. Snowmobiling, ice fishing, and cross-country skiing are enjoyed during the winter months. The area around the Lake is a conservationist’s paradise, with rolling hills and forests filled with wildlife including deer, moose, and many other birds and animals.


The Summer Village of Bondiss is a combination of full time residents and part time enthusiasts who all share their love for the lake. The residents are proud of the serenity of the lake, and encourage all residents and visitors to take care of the lake they love.

Website Revised 2018/05/07

 

Aerial Photo of Bondiss.

Bondiss


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Council

The decision making body for the Summer Village is a municipal Council consisting of three Councilors who were elected in 2017 for a four year term.

  • A Council is responsible for
    • developing and evaluating the policies and programs of the municipality;
    • making sure that the powers, duties and functions of the municipality are appropriately carried out;
    • carrying out the powers, duties and functions expressly given to it under the Municipal Government Act or Summer Village Bylaw.
  • A Council must not exercise a power or function or perform a duty that is by this or another enactment or bylaw specifically assigned to the chief administrative officer or a designated officer.

Mayor Peter Golanski

The Mayor is the chief elected official of the municipality and has duties of both councilor and chief elected official.

General duties of Chief Elected Official (Mayor):

  • preside when in attendance at a council meeting unless a Summer Village bylaw provides that another councilor or other person is to preside, and
  • perform any other duty imposed on a chief elected official by the Municipal Government Act or Summer Village bylaw.
  • The chief elected official is a member of all all bodies to which council has the right to appoint members under this Act, unless the council (or the MGA) otherwise provides.
  • to consider the welfare and interests of the municipality as a whole and to bring to council's attention anything that would promote the welfare or interests of the municipality;
  • to participate generally in developing and evaluating the policies and programs of the municipality;
  • to participate in council meetings and council committee meetings and meetings of other bodies to which they are appointed by the council;
  • to obtain information about the operation or administration of the municipality from the chief administrative officer or a person designated by the chief administrative officer;
  • to keep in confidence matters discussed in private at a council or council committee meeting until discussed at a meeting held in public;
  • to perform any other duty or function imposed on councilors by this or any other enactment or by the council.
 
Steve H

Deputy Mayor Fred Harmatys

General duties of the Deputy Mayor:

The Deputy Mayor, in addition to performing the duties of a councilor has the responsibility for presiding as the chief elected official in the absence of the Mayor.

  • preside when in attendance at a council meeting unless a bylaw provides that another councilor or other person is to preside, and
  • perform any other duty imposed on a chief elected official by the Municipal Government Act or Summer Village bylaw.
  • The chief elected official is a member of all all bodies to which council has the right to appoint members under this Act, unless the council (or the MGA) otherwise provides.
  • to consider the welfare and interests of the municipality as a whole and to bring to council's attention anything that would promote the welfare or interests of the municipality;
  • to participate generally in developing and evaluating the policies and programs of the municipality;
  • to participate in council meetings and council committee meetings and meetings of other bodies to which they are appointed by the council;
  • to obtain information about the operation or administration of the municipality from the chief administrative officer or a person designated by the chief administrative officer;
  • to keep in confidence matters discussed in private at a council or council committee meeting until discussed at a meeting held in public;
  • to perform any other duty or function imposed on councilors by this or any other enactment or by the council.
 
Fred Harmatys

Councilor Lawrence Habiak

Councilors have the following duties:

  • to consider the welfare and interests of the municipality as a whole and to bring to council's attention anything that would promote the welfare or interests of the municipality;
  • to participate generally in developing and evaluating the policies and programs of the municipality;
  • to participate in council meetings and council committee meetings and meetings of other bodies to which they are appointed by the council;
  • to obtain information about the operation or administration of the municipality from the chief administrative officer or a person designated by the chief administrative officer;
  • to keep in confidence matters discussed in private at a council or council committee meeting until discussed at a meeting held in public;
  • to perform any other duty or function imposed on councilors by this or any other enactment or by the council.
 
Lawrence Habiak

Chief Administrative Officer Ed Tomaszyk.

The Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) of the Summer Village is appointed by, and reports to, Council. The CAO is responsible for the overall administration of the Summer Village.The responsibilities of the CAO include overseeing municipal operations and ensuring Council's priorities and strategic directions are achieved. In addition, the CAO is charged with keeping Council up to date on corporate matters and ensuring that Council policy is implemented and bylaws are enforced.

Chief Administrative Officer (CAO)
Summer Village of Bondiss
724 Baptiste Drive
West Baptiste, AB
T9S 1R8

Telephone (780) 675-9270

Email
tomaszyk@mcsnet.ca
 

 
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Athabasca Regional Waste Management Services:

Transfer Station/Landfill Hours of Operation. Download

 

Sewage Bylaw 04-10:

A Sewage Bylaw was enacted on June 25, 2011. This Bylaw states “On or before December 31, 2010, an approved system shall be installed and maintained on all properties which are being used for residential, recreational or commercial purposes within the Summer Village of South Baptiste.” In other words, all private sewage systems shall comply with the Albert Private Sewage Systems Standards of Practice 2009, effective December 31, 2010. Notices were sent to all property owners in the Summer Village.
During the summer of 2013, a suitably qualified contractor was hired to conduct an “Inventory of Private Sewage Systems”. The purpose of the inventory is to create a record of private sewage systems in the Summer Village and to obtain an opinion on whether installed systems conform to provincial standards as required by the Sewage Bylaw.

Property owners with non-conforming systems were notified on July 18, 2014, are are expected to take remedial action to bring respective systems into compliance.

Sewage Bylaw 04-10 Download

Newsletters:

2018 Spring Newsletter Download

2017 Christmas Newsletter Dowload

2017 Spring Newsletter Download

2016 Newsletter Download

 

Transfer/Landfill Sites Hours of Operation. Download

 

Financial Statements:

2017 Financial Statement Download

2016 Financial Statement Download

 

Land Use Zoning:

All Municipalities are required to enact a Land Use Bylaw providing for Land Use Zoning. This essentially classifies the type of development allowed on a parcel of land and contains rules for setback distances from property boundaries, total percentage of lot area covered by buildings, maximum height of buildings and other matters relative to development. Please consult the Summer Village of Bondiss Land Use Bylaw for details.

This bylaw contains the rules and regulations for the development of land in the Summer Village.

Land Use Bylaw:

The Summer Village of Bondiss issues Development Permits under the auspices of the Land Use Bylaw.

Bondiss Land Use Bylaw: Download

Development Permit Application Form. Download

Permit Application Forms: (Building, Plumbing, Electrical, Gas & Sewage)

Permits for the foregoing disciplines are available from the Inspections Group in Edmonton who conduct inspections on behalf of the Summer Village which is accredited under the Alberta Safety Codes Act.

Download Application Forms from: http://www.inspectionsgroup.com/?p=permit_applications

Information on Permits and Compliance: Inspections Group Permits and Compliance.

 

Development Permits Issued:

 

DP 2018_003_Monczunski

DP 2018_001_Penney

DP 2017_006_Lesage

DP 2017_001_Makarowski.

DP 2016_006_Coates.

DP 2016_005_Coates.

DP 2016_002_Bacon.

 

For more information:

Administrator
Summer Village of Bondiss
724 Baptiste Drive,
West Baptiste, AB
T9S 1R8

Email Tomaszyk@mcsnet.ca

 

 

 

Current Wildfire Hazard

Skeleton Lake and Athabasca County are within the Lac La Biche forest protection area. Current Wildfire Hazard.

Free Hazardous Fuel Disposal Weekend

Athabasca County, in cooperation with the Athabasca Regional Waste Management Services Commission (ARWMSC); is proposing a FireSmart project again this May to help property owners with their FireSmart spring clean-up. The project will include the “Free Hazardous Fuel Disposal Weekend”; all waste transfer sites will waive the fees to ratepayers for disposal of waste brush and trees during the long weekend in May. This program has been a very cost effective way of encouraging FireSmart practices.

In the past, ARWMSC has planned for the free FireSmart week, around the May long weekend holiday (18th to the 28th). The program will be advertised in the newspaper and on the web, prior to the May long weekend. As in past years, ARWMSC will invoice the County for the entire program and we will contact each Summer Village with their share.

Check Winter Burn Sites:

Additional information here: http://www.athabascacounty.com/check-winter-burn-sites/

FireSmart

The threat of wildfire is always imminent in communities if preventative measures are not taken into consideration, planned, and implemented in advance. As more new developments grow in forested areas and new dwellings are built in natural areas, the public should be aware of and united against the problems related to wildfire. There should be an awareness of preventative actions that can be taken in advance to supplement the efforts of organized firefighting services.

Forest and prairie wildfires are capable of spreading at an astonishing rate. Crowning wildfires often spread at rates of 7 kilometres per hour, and can potentially send embers as far as 2 kilometres ahead of the fire. Wind-blown prairie fires can travel at speeds in excess of 10 kilometres per hour.
In Alberta, 50 per cent of wildfires are caused by human activity. The remaining 50 per cent are sparked naturally by lightning.
Over the last 10 years, an average of 1,300 wildfires a year have burned 210,000 hectares of forest annually in Alberta. Wildfires have forced the evacuation of thousands of people from their communities, and have even destroyed homes.
If you live in or near a forested area, you may be more likely to encounter a wildfire. The best way to protect yourself against loss, damage or injury is to practice FireSmart principles on your property.
By following the FireSmart Home Owner’s Manual, you can help reduce that risk.

A copy of the FireSmart Home Owner's Manual can be downloaded here. Home Owners Firesmart Manual

Download a copy of the 2016 Bondiss Wildfire Mitigation Strategy Download.

Download the Spring 2014 FireSmart Newsletter.

Download the Spring 2013 FireSmart Newsletter.

Download the Spring 2012 FireSmart Newsletter.

 

 

 

Regional FireSmart Plan

This FireSmart Plan identifies the potential risk of wildfire to the communities within the Forest Protection Area in the Athabasca County and provides recommendations to minimize that risk through the use of vegetation management, development control, legislation, public education, interagency cooperation, and emergency planning initiatives.

In 2003 supported by the Athabasca County, the Summer Villages, Hamlets and Country Residential Subdivisions Sustainable Resource Development completed a FireSmart Plan covering communities around Baptiste Lake, Crooked Lake, Island Lake, recreation areas and club facilities around Narrow and Long Lakes. This original 2003 FireSmart Plan also included the hamlets of Breynat and Wandering River.

The FireSmart plan will provide a working document to assist elected officials, municipal staff, emergency responders, land managers and local residents to plan and implement FireSmart initiatives within the communities around Baptiste Lake and in Athabasca County.

 

A Copy of the recently updated Athabasca Regional FireSmart Plan 2011 can be downloaded here. FireSmart Plan 2011

 

FireSmart Flammable Fuel Reduction -- Bondiss

In cooperation with Alberta Sustainable Resource Development Bondiss is in the late stages of aFlammable Fuel Reduction project that begain in the fall of 2014. The proposed project is consistent with the Athabasca Regional FireSmart Plan 2011.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Council Meetings.

Please contact the Summer Village Administrator at 780 675 9270 if you require any information on dates for meetings of Council.

The next meeting of Council will be held at the call of the Mayor

 

Formation of Foam on Water Bodies.

The following article by Ron Zurawell provides information on the formation of foam on water bodies. Foam on Water Bodies.

Credit: Dr. Ron Zurawell, Ph.D., P.Biol. Limnologist/Water Quality Specialist, Alberta Environment

 

Health officials change public warnings about dangerous algae blooms in Alberta lakes

 

 

After four years and almost 100 blue-green algae advisories for Alberta lakes, the provincial health authority is changing the way it warns the public about the scummy, green growth that occurs in some of the province’s favourite swimming spots every year.

Lake users will be told if the toxin-producing organism is present — but they will only be cautioned to stay out of the water if a blue-green algae bloom is visible, often appearing as scum, fuzz or globs on the surface of water.

It’s a significant change from when Albertans were cautioned not to swim or wade in a lake where blue-green algae had been detected, no matter the size of the lake or the size of the bloom. The warning system had been in place since 2011 after the formation of Alberta Health Services, and advisories were widely disseminated through news outlets and social media.

“When people were getting these health advisories, they were getting the mental image that an entire lake was totally covered with algae and deadly to swim in,” said Mayor Don Davidson of the summer village Grandview on Pigeon Lake.

Davidson blames the media for misinterpreting the advisories, sometimes using photographs from an extreme blue-green algae bloom that plagued Pigeon Lake in 2006.

“People would be going to the lake and they’d hear on the radio that there are blooms at various lakes and they’d turn around to go home.”

Blue-green algae is actually a bacteria called cyanobacteria, which is present in all Alberta lakes. But the bacteria thrives with heat, light and nutrients such as phosphorous and nitrogen. Alberta’s nutrient-rich soils mean its lakes are prone to blue-green algae especially in hot summer months, while development and agriculture activities also introduce nutrients into a lake.

The blooms, and the toxins they produce, can make people or animals sick. Humans can experience skin irritation, rashes, sore throats, red eyes or swollen lips, among other symptoms. Drinking the water can lead to more serious illness, especially in pets or livestock that may drink a lot of lake water.

“It is AHS’s duty to protect health and to ensure the public is aware of potential risks to their health. This is why AHS issues blue-green algae advisories,” Dr. Gerry Predy, senior medical officer of health with AHS, said in an email.

“Historically, we have placed less emphasis on the visibility of blooms as the measure of concern. This new messaging will better convey the importance of avoiding visible blooms, rather than whole lake avoidance ... Blooms can move rapidly from one location in a lake to another, and it is not possible for us to know where in a lake these may be, which is why we have further emphasized the importance of avoiding visible blooms.”

Many who live in lakeside communities or work closely with them say there’s no doubt the four-year-old advisory program was causing a degree of “panic.”

Alberta lakes may be experiencing more blooms because of increased development in local watersheds, but there has also been an increase in monitoring and how the public is informed.

“One of the problems was that people were saying, ‘We never had blooms before,’ ” said Bradley Peter, Lakewatch program manager with the Alberta Lake Management Society (ALMS).

“I think there was a misunderstanding with the advisory program and it took a lot of work to educate people that they weren’t monitoring it before; you’ve probably always had this and you just weren’t warned about the toxicity.”

The society does extensive data collection in Alberta lakes and Peter said the society was previously taking “the most cautious” route with its advisories, but that the position changed as more data was collected.

“From ALMS’s perspective, we’re really glad because the changes they’re making to the advisory system is based on the evidence they’ve collected with all of these samples over the years,” he said.

Arin MacFarlayne Dyer, the society’s executive director, hopes people won’t be unnecessarily avoiding Alberta lakes.

“With somewhere like Pigeon Lake, there’s sometimes the feeling that nothing can be done. But that should change with the message that you can swim in it, as long as you don’t see a green patch. And hopefully people understand that some green patches are completely natural.”

 

Invasive Invaders Invading!  
- Gavin Berg & Kate Wilson
(Alberta Environment & Sustainable Resource Development)

With warming temperatures and thawing lakes, there is more on our mind than peaceful weekends at the lake this summer! Aquatic invasive mussel species are knocking on Alberta’s door, threatening to show up at any given time and totally change the ecology of our local lakes and waterbodies.

1Hitching a ride between lakes on boats, trailers and unwashed equipment, zebra and quagga mussels of the Dreissenid family are spreading throughout eastern Canada and the western United States at an almost unstoppable rate! 

Originally from the Eurasian waters of the Black Sea and Caspian Sea, it is believed that they spread to North America through the ballast water of large shipping vessels travelling down the St. Laurence Seaway. Once established in the Great Lakes region, boaters unknowingly helped move the species around the continent, infesting lakes and waterways from southern Ontario to Louisiana and west to Nevada and California. Many lakes and reservoirs across the southwestern United States is now home to quagga and/or zebra mussels.   

So what’s the big deal?  Imagine your beach having so many shells on it that you had to wear water shoes to prevent your feet from being cut when you go in the water (not to mention the smell of rotting shells).  Imagine taking your dock out each year only to find it caked with mussels.  Imagine your boat hoist being unusable because the mussels on the pipes prevent the hoist from going up and down.  Imagine your potable water supply drying up because the intake pipes are too clogged with mussels. Imagine all of these things and then expand those thoughts to the larger picture.  The Government of Alberta is responsible for approximately $8 billion worth of water infrastructure, including hydro electric and irrigation systems.  Including the private sector, our water infrastructure is valued at over $14  billion – which does not include annual costs to replace and maintain facilities if mussels were to invade our lakes and rivers. Local industries also have a large stake in the issue.  If these systems become fouled with invasive mussels, the amount of resources required to control the problem will be astronomical.  These are real threats and one only has to look to our neighbours to the south to see the evidence and damage these species are causing.

2To date, there has been no record of the species occurring in Alberta waterways, although there have been several mussel-fouled boats intercepted already this season! Most other jurisdictions have mandatory watercraft inspection stations with the same goal of thwarting a mussel invasion in mind. These inspections stations are incredibly valuable face-to-face educational opportunities as well as a mighty preventative tool. Ensuring that boats are CLEAN, DRAINED, and DRY prevent all kinds of other invasive species from taking up residence in our waters too, Eurasian watermilfoil, New Zealand mudsnails, and Didymo, to name a few. Due to the vast number of boat launches, it usually makes the most sense to set inspection stations up on major highways, which targets the highest risk boaters (who travel with their watercraft or buy them elsewhere) and provides the best safeguard to protecting our lakes.

 

Text Box: To report AIS or a mussel-fouled boat, please call  1-855-336-BOATZebra and quagga mussels eat by filtering water and removing microscopic organisms.  In a water body with a large outbreak of mussels, this filter-feeding can quickly deplete the lake of an important food source for native species in the lake, such as the larval and juvenile stages of sport fish.  Additionally, by removing the microscopic organisms the water becomes much clearer.  Less turbid water leads to much higher plant growth which wreaks havoc on boaters and changes the delicate balance of the natural ecosystem.  Mussels have also been linked to exacerbating algae outbreaks and contributing to large scale bird die-offs due to botulism contamination up the food chain.     

The Alberta Government is initiating a program to fortify our borders from the threat of these invasive species.  In the summer of 2013, boat inspection stations will be set up at some of our most vulnerable border crossings and a monitoring program will be initiated to ensure that our lakes have not already been infested.  In addition, we will have an emergency response in place that will enable us to respond to situations where mussel-fouled boats can be intercepted and properly decontaminated before launching in Alberta lakes.

There are a few simple steps that people can take to prevent aquatic hitchhikers when transferring equipment from one water body to another:

  • CLEAN your equipment.  Before you leave the access area or dock, remove any plants, mud or debris. When you get home, soak your gear in a 2% bleach solution (20 ml of bleach per 1L of water) for one minute.  Wash your boat with warm soapy water.
  • DRAIN all the water from your boat and equipment (coolers, live wells, bilges, buckets and ballasts) before leaving the boat launch area.
  • DRY your gear completely between trips and allow the wet areas of your boat to air dry.

3
Spread the word, not the species.  Informing water users of the issues surrounding these species and the steps to take to reduce the threat is a major step that we can take to get ahead of the problem. If you or someone you know is bringing a boat in from elsewhere or planning on traveling with their boat, help us spread the word and protect our waters!

 

 

 

 

Contact Information

Summer Village of Bondiss
724 Baptiste Drive,
West baptiste, Alberta.
T9S 1R8

Telephone 780 675 9270

Email Tomaszyk@mcsnet.ca